Category Archive:
Teaching and learning principles

The Transformation of the Possessive Instinct

Transformation of the possessive

For the child under the age of seven years another indicator of on-track development is the sublimation of the possessive instinct. This transformation of the possessive instinct occurs when the child is given an environment where he or she has the right to use the materials as long as he or she wishes, while respecting […]


Love Of Silence And Working Alone

love of silence

The nature of the young child following natural and normal development is one that loves silence and working alone. Until children enter into a different stage of development, around the time that they lose their first tooth, this love of silence and working alone remains. The desire to be out in the community and working […]


The Child’s Spontaneous Concentration

spontaneous concentration

In the young child there are observable characteristics of behavior that help us know that a child is following normal development.  These characteristics follow: love of order, love of work, deep spontaneous concentration, attachment to reality, love of silence and working alone, sublimation of the possessive instinct, power to act from real choice not just […]


The Child’s Love Of Work

Love of Work

The young child’s love of work, or being involved in meaningful activity, is an inborn trait.  With proper nourishment this love survives a lifetime.  Even in utero the child is involved what can only be classified as work—growing and moving in a confined environment. Movement defines a child’s activity from the first kick in the […]


Understanding A Child’s Love Of Order

Understanding love of order

As parents and teachers we are concerned about doing the right things with our children. When our children go through difficult periods, we can spend nights tossing and turning about what can be the matter. As our tools can be friend or foe, depending on how we use them, it can be helpful if we […]


The Missing Element

The Element

In his book, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything, Ken Robinson, Ph.D. tells us that we each need to find that place where the things we love to do intersect with the things we know how to do well. Robinson calls this place of intersecting talent and passion “the Element.” Each person needs […]


Eat, Drink, Breathe, Think

eat drink breathe think

A newspaper article written by a physician summarized a discussion on health with these words: It’s about what you eat and what you drink, What you breathe and what you think. What you eat. Putting the right food into our bodies is essential to good health, as well as physical and mental development. Today we […]


Bloom’s Taxonomy

bloom's taxonomy

As we watch our children grow and learn, how can we, as parents and teachers, help direct our children to the next step in learning? One helpful tool to help us think about the steps in learning is Bloom’s Taxonomy. Benjamin Bloom in 1956 described six levels of questioning that reflect a person’s mastery of […]


Five Hindrances to Enlightenment

Five hindrances to enlightenment

Last week’s post discussed how seven factors in Zen Buddhist teachings might be seen as road signs to happy and healthy human development. These seven factors are universal virtues that are found in most cultures of the world, in different words and contexts, but there all the same. Mindfulness. Investigation. Energy. Joy. Tranquility. Concentration. Equanimity. […]


Seven Factors of Enlightenment

7 factors of enlightenment

Zen Buddhist monks might be the last people you’d think would clown around. Laughing, though, is an expression of joy, and joy is one of the seven factors of enlightenment. Reading an article about a Zen Buddhist monk who teaches students to smile, laugh, and tell jokes made me curious about the other six factors […]